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Parfait d'Amour - Chapter 3

bourbonrose:

Jogan AU. Inspired by both Moulin Rouge and Rent. 

Summary: After months of traveling through Europe, living on music and love, Logan finally returns to his best friend in New York. There, he discovers that a lot has changed. Instead of the world, Derek dominates the bar in a luxurious nightclub called the Moulin Rouge. When Logan visits him, his eyes immediately fall on the main act, the seductive dancer with the haunting eyes and a smile that glows with the light of a thousand stars. But falling in love comes with a price they both struggle to pay for.

Disclaimer: All recognizable characters belong to CP Coulter and her story Dalton

Thanks Judith for betaing and thanks Steph for making amazing art!

Enjoy! I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments :)

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mresundance:

vivalaglamourpuss:

an important factual presentation by me

All the facts.

Nope. 

How about half the facts. 

Cleopatra was of Hellenistic Greek descent, not Egyptian. 

Cleopatra was a member of the Ptolemaic dynasty, a family of Greek [4] origin that ruled Egypt after Alexander the Great's death during the Hellenistic period. The Ptolemies, throughout their dynasty, spoke Greek[5] and refused to speak Egyptian, which is the reason that Greek as well as Egyptian languages were used on official court documents such as the Rosetta Stone.[6] By contrast, Cleopatra did learn to speak Egyptian[7] and represented herself as the reincarnation of an Egyptian goddess, Isis.

Cleopatra originally ruled jointly with her father, Ptolemy XII Auletes, and later with her brothers, Ptolemy XIII and Ptolemy XIV, whom she married as per Egyptian custom, but eventually she became sole ruler. As pharaoh, she consummated a liaison with Julius Caesar that solidified her grip on the throne. She later elevated her son with Caesar, Caesarion, to co-ruler in name.

She probably would have been darker than Elizabeth Taylor, but no, she would not have been African or Egyptian in complexion.

Here is a bust which was made of her during her lifetime:

File:Kleopatra-VII.-Altes-Museum-Berlin1.jpg

Compare to a bust of Nefertiti:

image

Akhenaten:

image

Ramses I:

Stone head carving of Paramessu (Ramesses I), originally part of a statue depicting him as a scribe. On display at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Ramses the Great:

image

And the last, native Egyptian Pharaoh before Egypt was first taken over by Persia, and then Alexander the Great (Greece):

File:Psamtik III.jpg

Cleopatra clearly bears little resemblance to any pharaohs who descended from “native Egyptian” stock, prior to the Persian and Greek conquests. She is not Egyptian like the people you have shown in the book of the dead (bottom slide) or the depiction of Isis at the top, both of which come from classical Egypt, well before the time of conquest and invasion (and by “well before” I mean hundreds and even thousands of years). She is Hellenistic Egyptian, she spoke Egyptian, she declared herself the reincarnation of Isis (who was, when all is said and done, one of the most powerful, popular, and well known deities of the ancient world, so it wouldn’t have been unusual even for some Greek women who did  not live in Egypt to associate with Isis)  … but Cleopatra traced her lineage to the ancient Greeks. 

This is a painting from the tomb of Seti I, and depicts how Egyptians saw themselves and others:

image

From left to right: Berber/Libyan, a Nubian, a guy from the Middle East, and an Egyptian. 

You can see the Egyptian is brown. There are other paintings and sculptures which suggest Egyptians could also be darker, and even black such as the Nubian Pharaohs of the 25th Dynasty. 

As for what the Greeks looked like …

Finding artwork of ancient Greece where the colors haven’t been washed off (ie, in the statues) or that are not replicas can be tricky. The best approximation I can find of ancient Greek skin tones is through Minoan art, which predates Cleopatra by many thousands of years. But here are some frescoes from that time and place:

image

You can see these Cretan women are pale with dark curly hair.

image

This is a Minoan fisherman. He is fairly dark red-brown, perhaps because he was outside much of the time. 

image

This is a prince/noble. He is paler. 

image

These boxing children are fairly tan in complexion. 

File:Knossos bull.jpg

In this fresco the bull jumper is darker than both of his companions, perhaps for dramatic effect, but we’ve already seen both men and women painted with lighter complexions in other frescos. 

Here are some busts of women during the Hellenistic period, the same time as Cleopatra:

image

image

image

image

As you can see … they bear a lot more similarity to Cleopatra:

File:Kleopatra-VII.-Altes-Museum-Berlin1.jpg

Curly hair, intricately styled (very in fashion for Greek women at that time!), plus the facial features are a closer fit. 

Cleopatra was not native Egyptian. She was a Greek Egyptian. She would probably not be as dark as some of the Egyptians, though, I am guessing she would still not be milky, creamy, pale white as Elizabeth Taylor.

But nope. Not native Egyptian, and not Nubian Egyptian by any stretch of the imagination. 

If you want to dispute racism and ethnocentrism in history, that’s really cool, but get your facts right please. 

PS. You guys know that race isn’t a binary from white to black, right? That humans, since migrating out of Africa, have been pretty racially diverse, right? I mean, you can SEE that the Greeks weren’t, de facto,  ”white” and that there were different shades all over the place, right?

Good. 

Because these binary (black/white) discussions about race in the ancient world are insultingly simplistic. 

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Parfait d'Amour - Chapter 3

Jogan AU. Inspired by both Moulin Rouge and Rent. 

Summary: After months of traveling through Europe, living on music and love, Logan finally returns to his best friend in New York. There, he discovers that a lot has changed. Instead of the world, Derek dominates the bar in a luxurious nightclub called the Moulin Rouge. When Logan visits him, his eyes immediately fall on the main act, the seductive dancer with the haunting eyes and a smile that glows with the light of a thousand stars. But falling in love comes with a price they both struggle to pay for.

Disclaimer: All recognizable characters belong to CP Coulter and her story Dalton

Thanks Judith for betaing and thanks Steph for making amazing art!

Enjoy! I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments :)

And so I grew from colt to stallion, as wild and reckless as thunder over the land. Racing with the eagle, soaring with the wind. Flying? There were times I believed I could.

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All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

From the ashes a fire shall be woken,
A light from the shadows shall spring;
Renewed shall be blade that was broken,
The crownless again shall be king.


- J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring (via hqlines)

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sully-s:

Egyptian Mermaid 

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Parfait d'Amour - Chapter 2

Jogan AU. Inspired by both Moulin Rouge and Rent. 

Summary: After months of traveling through Europe, living on music and love, Logan finally returns to his best friend in New York. There, he discovers that a lot has changed. Instead of the world, Derek dominates the bar in a luxurious nightclub called the Moulin Rouge. When Logan visits him, his eyes immediately fall on the main act, the seductive dancer with the haunting eyes and a smile that glows with the light of a thousand stars. But falling in love comes with a price they both struggle to pay for.

Disclaimer: All recognizable characters belong to CP Coulter and her story Dalton

Thanks Judith for betaing and thanks Steph for making amazing art!

Enjoy! I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments :)

awesomephilia:

fun fact: in dutch we say “helaas pindakaas”, which translates to “unfortunately peanut butter” and i think that’s beautiful